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Kestrel II SP-529 - History

Kestrel II SP-529 - History


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Kestrel II

A former name retained.

(SP-529: t. 93; 1. 108'; b. 18'; dr. 8'6"; s. 12 k.; cpl. 9; a. I 3-pdr.)

Kestrel II, a motor boat, was built by Percy Tuttle of Greenport, Long Island, N.Y., in 1912 and owned by D. Herbert Hostetter of New York City. Acquired under free lease, she was taken over by the Navy 2 June 1917 and commissioned at Newport, R.I., 4 June, Chief Boatswain's Mate C. E. Black, USNRF, in command.

Assigned to the 2d Naval District at Newport, Kestrel II operated out of New London, Conn., on section and shore patrol in Long Island Sound. She decommissioned 6 January 1919 and was returned to her former owner the same day.


Kestrel II SP-529 - History

Kestrel II , a 93-ton (108-foot) motor yacht, was built in 1912 by Percy Tuttle at Greenport, on New York's Long Island. Leased by the Navy during the first months of U.S. participation in World War I, she was placed in commission as USS Kestrel II (SP-529) in early June 1917. During the next year and a half, she operated on patrol duties in Long Island Sound, based at New London, Connecticut. Kestrel II was decommissioned and returned to her owner in January 1919.

This page features our only views of the motor yacht Kestrel II , which served as USS Kestrel II (SP-529) in 1917-1919.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Kestrel II (U.S. Motor Boat, 1912)

Photographed prior to her World War I Navy service. She served as USS Kestrel II (SP-529) in 1917-19.

The original print is in National Archives' Record Group 19-LCM.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 57KB 740 x 500 pixels

Kestrel II (American Motor Yacht, 1912)

Underway prior to World War I.
Photographed by Edwin Levick, New York.
This pleasure craft served as USS Kestrel II (SP-529) in 1917-1919.


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4 Answers 4

It's a full blown web server. You can run your ASP.NET Core application using just Kestrel.

But when I run my website, I still get the IIS Express icon in the system tray

In your ASP.NET application, probably in the wwwroot directory, you'll see a web.config that contains this:

This is the HttpPlatformHandler. Essentially, what this does is forward all requests to Kestrel. IIS Express (and IIS for that matter) will not run ASP.NET themselves anymore. Instead, they will act as proxies that simply pass requests and responses back and forth from Kestrel. There is still advantages of using IIS, specifically it gives you security configuration, kernel-level caching, etc.

I'd like to offer an alternative answer, with some history, so that you might understand why Kestrel comes, even if you only use Windows and IIS.

At the very beginning of ASP.NET development before year 2000, clearly Microsoft created two pieces to host ASP.NET WebForms apps,

  • Cassini, later became ASP.NET Development Server in Visual Studio. It is a fully managed web server written in C# based on HttpListener . Of course, since it was for development only, many features were never implemented. As Microsoft made the source code of Cassini available for the public, there are third parties who forked the code base and added more features, which started the Cassini family.
  • ASP.NET support on IIS (revision 1). Because IIS was 4.0 and 5.0/5.1 at that time, which has nothing like application pools, ASP.NET even has its own worker process ( aspnet_wp.exe ).

So to develop a web app, you use Cassini, and to deploy you use IIS.

The introduction of application pools in IIS 6 required some changes on ASP.NET side, so aspnet_wp.exe became obsolete and replaced by aspnet_isapi.dll . That can be seen as ASP.NET support on IIS revision 2. So ASP.NET apps are being hosted in IIS worker processes w3wp.exe .

The introduction of integrated pipeline in IIS 7 and above required further changes, which replaced aspnet_isapi.dll with webengine4.dll . That can be seen as ASP.NET support on IIS revision 3. ASP.NET and IIS pipelines are unified.

You can see ASP.NET has become much more complex and tightly integrated with IIS, so Cassini started to show its age, and gradually was replaced by IIS Express (a user mode lite IIS).

Thus, in many cases, when people blame that IIS is slow, they should blame ASP.NET in fact. IIS itself without ASP.NET is pretty fast and stable, while ASP.NET was not developed with enough performance metrics in mind (as WebForms focuses quite a lot of productivities and RAD).

Then in November 2014, ASP.NET 5 (later renamed to ASP.NET Core) was announced and became a cross platform technology. Obviously Microsoft needed a new design to support Windows, macOS, and Linux, where all major web servers, nginx/Apache (or other web servers) should be considered besides IIS.

I think many would agree that Microsoft learned quite a lot from NodeJS, and then designed and developed Kestrel (based on libuv initially but might move to other technology soon). It is a light-weight web server like Cassini initially, but later more features are being added (like another answer commented, much more features so can be treated as a full web server). Though fully managed (some native dependencies exist), it is no longer a toy web server like Cassini.

Then why cannot you just use Kestrel? Why IIS Express and potentially IIS, nginx, or Apache are still needed? That primarily is a result of today's internet practice. Most web sites use reverse proxies to take requests from your web browsers and then forward to the application servers in the background.

  • IIS Express/IIS/nginx/Apache are the reverse proxy servers
  • Kestrel/NodeJS/Tomcat and so on are the application servers

Another answer already showed a link to Microsoft documentation, so you can take a look.

Microsoft developed HttpPlatformHandler initially to make IIS a good enough reverse proxy for Java/Python and so on, so planned to use it for ASP.NET Core. Issues started to appear during development, so later Microsoft made ASP.NET Core Module specifically for ASP.NET Core. That's ASP.NET support on IIS revision 4.

Starting from ASP.NET Core 2.2, ASP.NET Core Module for IIS (version 2) can host .NET Core environment inside IIS worker process ( w3wp.exe ), quite similar to ASP.NET 2.x/4.x. This mode is called "IIS in-process hosting". It can be considered as ASP.NET support on IIS revision 5.

Well, quite lengthy, but I hope I put all necessary pieces together and you enjoy reading it.


Kestrel II SP-529 - History

Hawker Hart prototype J9052 with naval adaptations as the development prototype for the Osprey.

The Hawker Osprey was a folding-wing, navalised version of Hawker Hart to Air Ministry Specification O.22/26, produced by H.G. Hawker.

The Hawker Hart prototype (J9052) was used for development of the Hawker Osprey (from 1927). Development of the Hawker Osprey also included adaptations for catapult launching and for seaplane operations.

The float undercarriage was designed to be interchangeable with the normal wheeled undercarriage, using the same four attachment points, thus allowing for both carrier-borne and conventional operation.

The Hawker Osprey development prototype J9052 with wings folded.

The modifications to the prototype, known as the Naval Hawker Hart produced against Specification O.22/26, resulted in the drafting of a new Specification 19/30, against which the production Hawker Osprey aircraft were procured.

Two production prototypes were ordered (S1667 and S1678), flying during 1931 and being tested in both landplane and seaplane form.

An initial production contract for 20 Hawker Osprey followed with Type I floats, using the Rolls-Royce Kestrel II MS engine (S1679 to S1698). The next batch of 17 aircraft (K2774 to K2790) were fitted with a larger fin and rudder.

Hawker Osprey I floatplane K2775 being hoisted aboard ship.

The Hawker Osprey entered service with the Fleet Air Arm in 1936, continuing into World War II where it was utilised as a Trainer for FAA Pilots.

A production contract was for 14 aircraft were built as Hawker Osprey II with Type II floats, although these were later modified to Hawker Osprey III standard. One Hawker Hart aircraft (K3594) was also converted to Hawker Osprey configuration.

Three trials aircraft (Hawker Osprey III stainless steel construction) were ordered for trials (S1699 to S1701). The first was tested on twin floats, whereas the last two were fitted with a single central float and wing-tip stabilising floats.

These were followed by production quantities of the Hawker Osprey III to Specification 10/33 with a Fairey Reed metal airscrew, dinghy (stowed in the starboard upper wing) and other modifications. Contracts were placed for 3 (further trials aircraft), 39, 7 and 14 aircraft, for a total of 66 production Hawker Osprey III.

By 1936, Hawker Ospreys had been deployed to 701 Squadron at RAF Kalafrana, acting in an anti-submarine and anti-piracy role. Over its life the Hawker Osprey saw service with Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish and UK military forces.

The final version for the Royal Navy was the Hawker Osprey IV, fitted with a Rolls-Royce Kestrel V engine. A total of 26 were ordered to Specification 26/35. These aircraft (K5742 to K5767) were later used as trainers and for target towing.

Hawker Osprey I S1681 was operated from HMS Eagle.

Variants & Number Built

  • Naval Hart (J9052) two Hawker Osprey I prototypes
  • 37 Hawker Osprey I production
  • 14 Hawker Osprey II,
  • 67 Hawker Osprey III
  • 26 Hawker Osprey IV.
  • Naval Hart plus 146 Hawker Osprey.

Export aircraft comprised:

  • 4 aircraft to Sweden (2401-2404 powered by a Swedish-built Bristol Pegasus engine). The first flight (2401) took place on 8th September 1934.
  • 2 Hawker Osprey II were supplied to Portugal (71 & 72). The first was in landplane configuration with the second as a seaplane. These aircraft were powered by the Kestrel II MS engine.

A single Osprey was supplied to Spain: This aircraft (EA-KAJ / ex-G-AEBD). This was in fact a company demonstrator fitted with a Rolls-Royce Kestrel V engine that was later changed to Hispano-Suiza 12X brs engine prior to delivery to Spain.

Hawker production:

  • 131 RN plus 7 export (138) plus at least two aircraft built locally in Sweden. Sweden are reported as using a total of six Hawker Osprey aircraft with serials 2401 to 2406, the first four of these having been built in the UK.

By the outbreak of the Second World War, the Hawker Osprey had largely been withdrawn from service. Those remaining continued in limited use as trainers and target tugs until early 1943.


The Varusa War (2035)

The carrier help the Wareagle squadron against the Varusean forses at the end of the war.

The OFS Kestrel II is the platform for the 1st take off in war condition of the G-18/10_Supernova.

The OFS Kestrel II, with the RMC Domaine, the flag ship of the 1st Allies fleet.

Trasmision of the last mission of the Varusa War:

OFS Kestrel II:" All survived ship take the attack formation!"

RMC Domaine:" The cruiser RMC VIllanova is sunk!"

RMC Dominer:" This is the missile destroyer Dominer enemy imbout!"

AWACS Oka Nieba:" No, problem, the allied Flieng fortres AFR-941 Lindk

Wareagle 1:" RMC Domaine and Kestrel II, take off confirmed. I begin the attack."


A Phase II Study in Patients With Moderate to Severe Active Crohn's Disease

The proposed study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center Phase II study to investigate the safety and efficacy of SHR0302 in patients with moderate to severe active Crohn's Disease. The study aims to evaluate the optimal dose of SHR0302 and time needed in inducing clinical remission in active CD. This is an 12+12 weeks study, in which participants who complete the first 12 weeks treatment phase, will have the option to enter a blinded active arms 12-week extension phase. Early withdrawn subjects during the first treatment phase cannot enter the extension phase. The total duration of the study participation, including extension and follow-up, will be approximately 26 weeks.

With the wealth of scientific evidence on JAK/STAT involvement in IBD, the data from similar class of new drugs and the current data on SHR0302 (JAK1 inhibitor), support the rationale to proceed with phase II studies to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SHR0302 in patients with moderate to severe active CD.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Crohn's Disease Drug: SHR0302 Drug: Placebos Phase 2

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 144 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Phase II Randomized, Placebo Controlled, Double-blind, Four Arms Dose-ranging Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of SHR0302 Compared to Placebo in Patients With Moderate to Severe Active Crohn's Disease
Actual Study Start Date : May 14, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : October 2021

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine
    The percentage of subjects achieving clinical remission defined as mean daily stool frequency (SF) 𕟪.5, and abdominal pain (AP) ≤ 1 using the Patient Reported Outcome from CDAI at week 1, 4, 8, 12, 13, 16, and 24. [ Time Frame: week 1, 4, 8, 12, 13, 16, and 24 ]
Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.

Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years to 75 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
  • Male and Female subject at 󖾆 and ≤ 75 years of age at randomization.
  • Subjects with a documented three-month history of diagnosed ileal, colonic, or ileocolonic Crohn's Disease at the time of randomization.
  • Currently having Crohn's Disease with Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score ≥ 220 to �.
  • Diagnosis of indeterminate colitis, or clinical findings suggestive of Ulcerative Colitis.
  • Subject with CD with stoma, gastric or ileoanal pouch, proto-colectomy or total colectomy, symptomatic stenosis or stricture, history of bowel perforation, suspected abscess actively draining fistula.
  • Treatment naïve subjects diagnosed with Crohn's disease, (without previous exposure to treatment).
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03677648

Show 81 study locations Hide 81 study locations

A Phase II Study in Patients With Moderate to Severe Active Ulcerative Colitis.

The proposed study is a randomized, double-blind,placebo-controlled, multi-center phase II study to investigatethe safety and efficacy of SHR0302 in patients with moderate to severe activeulcerative colitis. The study aims to evaluate the optimal dose of SHR0302 andtime needed in inducing clinical response in active ulcerative colitispatients.

This is an 8+8 weeksstudy, in which participants who complete the first 8 weeks treatment phase, will have the option to enter a blinded activearms 8-week extension phase. Early withdrawn subjects during the first treatment phasecannot enter the extension phase. The total duration of the study participation, including extension and follow-up, will be approximately 18weeks.

SHR0302 is a JAK1 inhibitor, capable of blocking JAK-STATs pathway and control inflammation. Therefore it has the potential to be a treatment for UC.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Ulcerative Colitis Drug: SHR0302 Drug: Placebos Phase 2

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 164 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Phase II Randomized, Placebo Controlled, Double-blind, 4 Arms Dose-ranging Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of SHR0302 Compared to Placebo in Patients With Moderate to Severe Active Ulcerative Colitis.
Actual Study Start Date : April 13, 2019
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 30, 2020
Actual Study Completion Date : February 3, 2021

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.

Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years to 75 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
  • Male and Female subject age ≥ 18 and 󖽛 years of age at randomization.
  • Active ulcerative colitis with a 9-point modified Mayo score of 5 to 9 points and endoscopic subscore of 2 to 3 (The duration of the time between endoscopy and baseline should not exceed 10 days and allow central over read turn over before randomization).
  • Subject should have at least three-month history of Ulcerative Colitis diagnosis at randomization.
  • Diagnosis of indeterminate colitis, or clinical findings suggestive of Crohn's disease.
  • Subjects with ulcerative colitis, which is confined to a proctitis (distal 15 cm or less).
  • Treatment naïve subjects diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (without previous exposure to treatment).
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03675477

Show 68 study locations Hide 68 study locations

Etymology

The carrier's name comes from kestrel, a name used for several members of the falcon genus of birds, Falco. Kestrels have a distinctive hunting strategy of hovering over the ground and swooping down to catch their prey. "Falco" would later be used as the name of Falco Squadron.

The Hubert class that the Kestrel belongs to is a fictional name for the real-life Nimitz class. Hubert shares its name with Brian E. Hubert, a gunner's mate on the USS Nimitz who died in 1999 after falling down a ventilation shaft. ⎢]


Watch the video: New Tiericide Kestrel Fit March 2016 + Some Livestream Highlights (May 2022).