Interesting

Hovey DD- 208 - History

Hovey DD- 208 - History

Hovey

(DD-208: dp. 1,190; 1. 314'4"; b. 30'8"; dr. 9'3"; s. 35 k.;
cpl. 167; a. 4 4", 8 .50 cal. mg., 2 dct.; cl. Clemson)

Hovey (DD-208) was launched 26 April 1919 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia; sponsored by Mrs. Louise F. Kautz, sister of Ensign Hovey; and commissioned 2 October 1919, Comdr. Stephen B. McKinney in command.

After shakedown off the coast of Florida and in the Caribbean Hovey sailed from Newport 19 December 1919 in company with Chand ler for the Azores and Brest, France, for duty as station ships She sailed from Dalmatia, Italy 10 July 1920 for the Adriatic to deliver important papers and claims. Arriving Constantinople 12 July she later visited various Russian ports as station ship until 17 December when she sailed for Port Said, Egypt, and duty with the Asiatic Fleet in the Philippines. Hovey remained on the Asiatic station until she returned to San Francisco 2 October 1922, decommissioning at San Diego, 1 February 1923.

Hovey recommissioned 20 February 1930 at San Diego, Commander Stuart O. Greig in command. After shakedown out of San Diego and Mare Island she served principally as training ship for reservists until 9 April 1934 when she transited the Panama Canal, arriving New York 31 May. After training and fleet exercises out of New England and off the Florida coast, Hovey returned to San Diego 9 November. After overhaul at Mare Island, she resumed her operations along the West Coast with additional exercises and 'deet problems in the Canal Zone and Hawaiian waters.

With the advances in technology and the good foresight and judgment of our naval leaders in strengthening America's Navy, Hovey converted to a high speed minesweeper and was reclassified DMS-11 19 November 1940. After intensive training she sailed 4 February 1941 for duty at Pearl Harbor. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941 Hovey was steaming in company with Chandler as antisubmarine screen for Mineapolis, engaged in gunnery practice some 20 miles off Pearl Harbor. The minesweeper immediately took up patrol and convoy duty around Pearl Harbor until 20 May when she escorted a 20-ship convoy to San Francisco, arriving 31 May. Hovey returned to Pearl Harbor in mid-June and sailed 10 July for the southwest Pacific escorting Argonne in company with Southard. She reached the Fiji Islands 23 July and joined Minesweeping Group of Rear Adm. Richmond K. Turner's South Pacific Amphibious Force the 31st.

On 7 August during the invasion of Guadalcanal, the first amphibious assault in the long island-hopping campaign, Hovev was assigned a screening station for the transports. Then, shortly before 0800, she took a bombardment station to cover the landings east of Gavutu. Japanese shore batteries opened up but were quickly silenced by accurate fire from Hovey and the other ships providing fire support. She next joined other DMS's for sweeps between Gavutu and Bungana Islands. The next morning she steamed into Lengo Channel to help ward off an attack by a squadron of torpedo bombers. The fire from our own surface units was so intense that it caused the enemy to drop their torpedoes prematurely at too great a range, thereby rendering the attack almost totally ineffective.

Hovey continued her operations around Guadalcanal before retiring to New Oaledonia 13 September for replenishment. From there she proceeded to Samoa before returning to Ndeni, Santa Cruz, with a reconnaissance party of marines on board. Returning to New Caledonia Hovey departed 10 October with two PT boats in tow and 127 drums of aviation gasoline on board, which she de livered to Tulagi two days later. Hovey continued escort duty between Guadalcan~al and Espiritu Santo, until she returned to San Francisco 19 April 1943 for overhaul. She joined a convoy out of Mare Island 31 May for New Caledonia, arriving 10 August. She then resumed her escort and patrol duties until 30 October when she joined Rear Adm. T. S. Wilkinson's III Amphibious Force for the Cape Torokina landing, 1 November 1943. Never before in the Pacific had a major landing been made so close to a major enemy air base as Torokina was to Rabaul. But NVilkinson's force had excellent air coverage and the operations vvent oiT so well that he informed his transports that they could bombard Cape Torokina. For the next week during the seizure of Empress Augusta Bay, Hovey operated with the invasion forces, screening transports and making prelanding sweeps.

Hovey continued screening and escort duties in the Solomons until 5 April 1944 when she escorted Ltudenwald from Tulagi to Majuro, Marshall Islands. She returned to Espiritu Santo 11 April and on the 20th joined Task Unit 34.9.3 (Captain Kane in Petrof Bay) delivering replacement planes to other carriers at Manus. The task unit rendezvoused 29 April with Fast Carrier Task Force 58 to furnish replacement planes for the first strikes on Truk. Proceeding to Florida Island, Hovey departed for the West Coast, arriving 31 May via Pearl Harbor.

Repairs complete, Hovey sailed for Pearl Harbor 29 July to become flagship for Mine Squadron Two (Commander W. R. Loud). She sortied from Port Purvis ~ September as part of the antisubmarine screen for Rear Admiral Oldendorf's Western Gunfire Support Group for operations in the southern Palaus. After sweeps between Angaur and Peleliu Islands and in Kossol Passage Hovey took up antisubmarine patrol in the transport area off Peleliu Island. She joined the Minesweeping and Hydrographie Group of' Rear Adm Thomas Sprague's Escort Carrier Group for the Invasion of Leyte (17-25 October 1944). On the 17th she began sweeping ahead of the high speed transports and fire support vessels in the approach to the landing beaches on Dinagat Island. After more sweeps through Looe Bay and the Taeloban-Dulag approach Hovey retired to Manus 25 October.

As flagship for Commander Loud's Minesweeping and Hydrographic Group, Hovey departed Manus 23 December, arriving Leyte Gulf the 30th. She sortied 2 January 1945, proceeded south through Suriago Strait and passed into the Mindanao Sea en route to the landings on Lingayen, Luzon. Many snoopers harassed the convoy during the night but no attacks developed until morning of the 3d. From then on the convoy was under air attack so much that Hovey had to adopt the policy of not firing unless she was directly under attack, lest she expend all her ammunition. By 6 January the minesweepers were in the entrance to Lingayen Gulf. At 0800 the sweepers came under attack and Hovey immediately splashed one suicide plane. As the ships made a return sweep, two suicide planes made straight runs on the last two ships in the column, crashing Brooks and Long. Hovey slipped her gear and stood in to assist Lorzg. Long's entire bridge and well deck was on fire, with intermittent explosions coming from the forward magazine and ready ammunition. Beeause of the explosions and air attacks, Hovey could not get alongside, but spent an hour picking up 149 survivors. At dark the sweepers made their night retirement and began steaming off the entrance to Lingayen Gulf. No more attacks occurred until 0425, 7 January, when enemy aircraft were picked up on radar. At 0450, one plane Jdying low to the water came in from the starboard quarter passing ahead of nOvev. A few moments later another plane coming from the port beam was put on flre by Chand ler. This plane passed very low over Hovey and crashed on the starboard beam. At 0455, the instant the burning plane crashed, Hovey was struck by a torpedo on her starboard side in the after engineroom. Lights and power were lost instantly. The stern remained nearly level and sinking to the top of the after deck house, the bow listed 40 degrees tn starboard and rose out of the water the ship breaking in half. Two minutes later the bow listed to 90 degrees, rose vertically and rapidly sank in 54 fathoms of water, suffering 24 killed in addition to 24 more men who were survivors from Long and Brooke.

In 1778 John Paul Jones said "I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harms way". So it was with Hovey. Though lightly armed, she braved enemy shore firej strafing and bombing attacks to complete minesweeping, fire support, escort duty, and many other missions. Constantly vigilant and ready for battle she fought her guns valiantly, inflicting serious damage on vital enemy units. She steamed boldly through enemy waters, contributing direetly to the sueeess of eight major operations. Her own gallant fighting spirit and the skill and courage of her entire crew reflected the highest credit upon Hovey and the U.S. Naval Service.

Hovey received eight battle stars for World War II service.


Wreck of USS Hovey (DD-208/DMS-11)

Laid down at Cramp Shipbuilding in Philadelphia in September 1918, USS Hovey commissioned into US Navy service in October 1919 as the 16th member of the Clemson Class of Destroyers. Assigned to the US Atlantic Fleet, she stood out of Norfolk and took up patrol duties in the Mediterranean, Adriatic and Black Seas before proceeding Eastward to the Philippines, where she took up duty with the US Asiatic Fleet in early 1921.

Remaining in the Far East patrolling the waters around the Philippines until late 1922, the Hovey fell victim to post-World War I budget cuts and fleet limitations upon her return to San Francisco in October she was ordered decommissioned. Entering the reserve fleet at San Diego in February 1923, the Hovey remained inactive for 10 years before she recommissioned in February 1930 as part of a Fleet-wide expansion. Operating out of San Diego as a training ship for Navy reservists after for the next four years, the Hovey eventually joined the frontline fleet and served as a Fleet Destroyer until the outbreak of war in Europe brought the then-elderly and technologically outdated Destroyer into the yard for conversion into a Destroyer Minesweeper in 1940. Following crew training in their new role, the Hovey stood out of San Diego in February 1941 and began operations out of Pearl Harbor with Mine Squadron 2. At sea escorting the Heavy Cruiser USS Minneapolis (CA-36) on gunnery exercises off Johnston Atoll during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the Hovey immediately returned to Pearl and began anti-submarine patrols and escort duty around the Hawaiian Islands.

Continuing this duty through July 1942, the Hovey departed Hawaiian waters as an escort for the USS Argonne (AP-4), Flagship of Rear Adm Richmond K. Turner's South Pacific Amphibious Force. Shaping her course for the soon-to-be embattled island of Guadalcanal, the Hovey began operations clearing mines, screening convoys and providing on-call fire support for US Amphibious operations which began on August 7th, 1942. The Hovey would spend the next eight months engaged in these duties supporting US and Allied forces in the fiercely opposed Guadalcanal, Tulagi and Southern Solomon Island Campaign before she returned to the US in April 1943 for a much-needed overhaul and upgrade to her systems.

Returning to the South Pacific in June 1943, the Hovey participated in the Bougainville Campaign through June 1944 before damage from a grounding sent her back to the US mainland for repairs and overhaul which saw her fitted for duty as the Flagship of Mine Squadron 2. Returning to combat duty at the Invasion of the Palau Islands, the Hovey was attached to an Escort Carrier Force bound for the Philippines in early October 1944 as the vanguard of a massive US armada which would make an Amphibious Invasion of Leyte. Working with her sisterships to clear the beaches off Leyte, the waters around Dinagat Islands and the Dulag-Tacloban channel to aide landing forces, the Hovey remained on station through the end of October before retiring to Manaus Island with the rest of her squadron for a period of refresher training and upkeep.

Departing Manaus in late December escorting a Leyte-bound convoy, the Hovey and the ships of Mine Squadron 2 detached from their charges on January 2nd, 1945 and shaped a course for Lingayen Gulf, where the group was ordered to sweep the approaches to Lingayen in advance of the first American amphibious landing on Luzon. Coming under repeated massed air attack from Japanese Kamikaze aircraft while engaged in their sweeps, the Hovey and her sisters spent the time period from January 2nd onward from at their General Quarters stations, as Japanese forces bent on repelling any American attempt to invade Luzon threw everything they had at the American ships. As they swept the large gulf on January 6th, a large wave of Kamikaze’s launched an attack on the Hovey and her formation, severely damaging the USS Brooks (DD-232/APD-10) and claiming the Hovey’s sistership USS Long (DD-209/DMS-12). After conducting a risky rescue effort alongside her stricken sister while under air attack, the Hovey withdrew with the rest of her Division as darkness fell to open waters outside of Lingayen Gulf.

Returning to Lingayen Gulf at first light the following morning with her load of survivors from both the USS Long and USS Brooks still crammed aboard, the Hovey took the lead of her formation and began sweeping operations shortly after 0400hrs. Less than half an hour later radar reports flashed out that enemy aircraft were inbound, and Hovey’s crew again secured her sweeps and manned their guns. Sighting two inbound torpedo bombers flying just above the water materializing out of the predawn haze at 0450hrs, Hovey’s gunners took both aircraft under fire, missing the first which buzzed the ship from her Starboard Quarter. The second aircraft was set afire from the gunners aboard the USS Chandler (DD-206/DMS-9) as it closed on the Hovey’s Port side, providing a brightly lit target for her gunners. Despite sending a pall of rounds into the onrushing aircraft, the Hovey’s gun crews could not stop the plane from hitting the ship and cartwheeling over her Starboard beam. At the same instant, a torpedo released from the first plane found its mark and slammed into the Hovey’s Starboard side at her aft engine room. The force of the blast buckled the Hovey’s keel and killed most of the men in her after engine room, in addition to knocking out power and communications to most of the ship. Within seconds the midship was exposed to massive flooding that snapped her keel in half and allowed the ship to begin breaking up.

Within two minutes of the torpedo impact, the Hovey’s Bow section was listing 90 degrees as men stationed there scrambled to abandon ship. Moments later, a bulkhead gave way and sent the Bow vertical in the water where it lingered for a few seconds before plunging to the bottom. Hovey’s Stern remained on an even keel as it slowly swamped, allowing most of the crew and rescued sailors there to get off before it too sank at this location at 0455hrs on January 7th, 1945. When the Hovey sank, she took 24 of her crew and 24 men from her sistership USS Long with her to the bottom.

For her actions on the morning of January 7, 1945, USS Hovey was awarded her eighth and final Battle Star for World War II service.


Hovey DD- 208 - History

This page features all the views we have concerning USS Hovey (DMS-11, formerly DD-208) following her conversion to a fast minesweeper.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 7 June 1942.
The ship appears to have twin 4"/50 gun mount forward, with a hinged sponson by it to allow a greater working circle for the gun crew.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 60KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 7 June 1942.
The ship retains her original four tall smokestacks, pre-war type pilothouse and tall foremast. She appears to carry twin 4"/50 gun mounts fore and aft and eight .50 caliber anti-aircraft machine guns.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 7 June 1942.
Note that she retained four smokestacks at this time.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 68KB 740 x 620 pixels

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 26 May 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 64KB 740 x 515 pixels

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 26 May 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 58KB 740 x 610 pixels

Seen from ahead, off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 26 May 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 65KB 740 x 610 pixels

Seen from astern, off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 26 May 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 68KB 740 x 610 pixels

Plan view, forward, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 20 May 1943.
USS LST-485 is in the left background.
White outlines mark recent alterations to Hovey .

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 71KB 740 x 605 pixels

Plan view, amidships, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 20 May 1943.
Tracks on deck are for shifting weights during an inclining experiment to determine the ship's stability.
Note davits, minesweeping gear, and men watching the inclining experiment in progress.
USS LST-485 is in the background.
White outlines mark recent alterations to Hovey .

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 140KB 740 x 605 pixels

Plan view, amidships looking aft, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 20 May 1943.
USS LST-485 (left) and USS LST-481 are in the background.
White outlines mark recent alterations to Hovey , among them Note 20mm guns and minesweeping gear.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 133KB 740 x 610 pixels

Plan view, aft, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 20 May 1943.
The bow of USS LST-485 is visible in the right background.
White outlines mark recent alterations to Hovey . Note her enlarged stern with her name welded to it, davits for minesweeping gear, and depth charge racks mounted over the propeller guards.


Contents

1919-1940 [ edit | edit source ]

After shakedown off the coast of Florida and in the Caribbean Hovey sailed from Newport, Rhode Island 19 December 1919 in company with Chandler for the Azores and Brest, France, for duty as station ship. She sailed from Dalmatia, Italy 10 July 1920 for the Adriatic Sea to deliver important papers and claims. Arriving Constantinople 12 July she later visited various Russian ports as station ship until 17 December when she sailed for Port Said, Egypt, and duty with the Asiatic Fleet in the Philippines. Hovey remained on the Asiatic station until she returned to San Francisco, California 2 October 1922, decommissioning at San Diego, 1 February 1923.

Hovey recommissioned 20 February 1930 at San Diego, California, Commander Stuart O. Greig in command. After shakedown out of San Diego and Mare Island she served principally as training ship for reservists until 9 April 1934 when she transited the Panama Canal, arriving New York 31 May. After training and fleet exercises out of New England and off the Florida coast, Hovey returned to San Diego 9 November. After overhaul at Mare Island, she resumed her operations along the West Coast with additional exercises and fleet problems in the Canal Zone and Hawaiian waters.

George Thomas Sullivan and Francis Henry Sullivan, two of the five Sullivan Brothers served aboard the Hovey.

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Hovey converted to a high speed minesweeper and was reclassified DMS-11 19 November 1940. After intensive training she sailed 4 February 1941 for duty at Pearl Harbor. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941 Hovey was steaming in company with Chandler as antisubmarine screen for Minneapolis, engaged in gunnery practice some 20 miles (40 km) off Pearl Harbor. The minesweeper immediately took up patrol and convoy duty around Pearl Harbor until 20 May when she escorted a 20-ship convoy to San Francisco, arriving 31 May. Hovey returned to Pearl Harbor in mid-June and sailed 10 July for the southwest Pacific escorting Argonne in company with Hovey. She reached the Fiji Islands 23 July and joined Minesweeping Group of Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner's South Pacific Amphibious Force the 31st.

Solomon Islands Campaign [ edit | edit source ]

On 7 August, during the invasion of Guadalcanal, the first amphibious assault in the long island-hopping campaign, Hovey was assigned a screening station for the transports. Then, shortly before 0800, she took a bombardment station to cover the landings east of Gavutu. Japanese shore batteries opened up but were quickly silenced by accurate fire from Hovey and the other ships providing fire support. She next joined other DMS's for sweeps between Gavutu and Bungana Islands. The next morning she steamed into Lengo Channel to help ward off an attack by a squadron of torpedo bombers. Intensive US anti-aircraft fire caused the Japanese planes to drop their torpedoes prematurely and hence at too great a range, thereby rendering the attack almost totally ineffective.

Hovey continued her operations around Guadalcanal before retiring to New Caledonia 13 September for replenishment. From there she proceeded to Samoa before returning to Ndeni, Santa Cruz, with a reconnaissance party of marines on board. Returning to New Caledonia, Hovey departed 10 October with two PT boats in tow and 127 drums of aviation gasoline on board, which she delivered to Tulagi two days later. Hovey continued escort duty between Guadalcanal and Espiritu Santo, until she returned to San Francisco 19 April 1943 for overhaul. She joined a convoy out of Mare Island 31 May for New Caledonia, arriving 10 August. She then resumed her escort and patrol duties until 30 October when she joined Rear Admiral Theodore S. Wilkinson's III Amphibious Force for the Cape Torokina landing, 1 November 1943. For the next week during the seizure of Empress Augusta Bay, Hovey operated with the invasion forces, screening transports and making prelanding sweeps.

Hovey continued screening and escort duties in the Solomons until 5 April 1944 when she escorted Lindenwald from Tulagi to Majuro, Marshall Islands. She returned to Espiritu Santo 11 April and on the 20th joined Task Unit 34.9.3 (Captain Kane in Petrof Bay) delivering replacement planes to other carriers at Manus. The task unit rendezvoused 29 April with Fast Carrier Task Force (TF 58) to furnish replacement planes for the first strikes on Truk. Proceeding to Florida Island, Hovey departed for the West Coast, arriving 31 May via Pearl Harbor.

Central Pacific Campaigns [ edit | edit source ]

Repairs complete, Hovey sailed for Pearl Harbor 29 July to become flagship for Mine Squadron Two (Commander W. R. Loud). She sortied from Port Purvis 6 September as part of the antisubmarine screen for Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf's Western Gunfire Support Group for operations in the southern Palaus. After sweeps between Angaur and Peleliu Islands and in Kossol Passage, Hovey took up antisubmarine patrol in the transport area off Peleliu Island. She joined the Minesweeping and Hydrographic Group of Rear Admiral Thomas Sprague's Escort Carrier Group for the invasion of Leyte (17–25 October 1944). On the 17th she began sweeping ahead of the high speed transports and fire support vessels in the approach to the landing beaches on Dinagat Island. After more sweeps through Looc Bay and the Tacloban-Dulag approach Hovey retired to Manus 25 October.

Invasion of Luzon [ edit | edit source ]

As flagship for Commander Loud's Minesweeping and Hydrographic Group, Hovey departed Manus 23 December, arriving Leyte Gulf the 30th. She sortied 2 January 1945, proceeded south through Surigao Strait and passed into the Mindanao Sea en route to the landings on Lingayen, Luzon. Many reconnaissance aircraft harassed the convoy during the night but no attacks developed until morning of 3 January.

From then on, the convoy was under such heavy air attack that Hovey had to adopt the policy of not firing unless she was directly under attack, fearing that she would expend all her ammunition. In the entrance to Lingayen Gulf, at 0800 the sweepers came under attack and Hovey immediately shot down one kamikaze. As the ships made a return sweep, two kamikazes made straight runs on the last two ships in the column, crashing into Brooks and Long. Hovey slipped her gear and stood in to assist Long. Long ' s entire bridge and well deck was on fire, with intermittent explosions coming from the forward magazine and ready ammunition. Because of the explosions and air attacks, Hovey could not get alongside, but spent an hour picking up 149 survivors. At dark the sweepers made their night retirement and began steaming off the entrance to Lingayen Gulf.

No more attacks occurred until 0425, 7 January, when enemy aircraft were picked up on radar. At 450, one plane flying low to the water came in from the starboard quarter passing ahead of Hovey. A few moments later, another plane coming from the port beam was put on fire by Chandler. This plane passed very low over Hovey and crashed on the starboard beam. At 0455, the instant the burning plane crashed, Hovey was struck by a torpedo on her starboard side in the after engineroom. Lights and power were lost instantly. The stern remained nearly level and sinking to the top of the after deck house, the bow listed 40 degrees to starboard and rose out of the water, the ship breaking in half. Two minutes later the bow listed to 90 degrees, rose vertically and rapidly sank in 54 fathoms (99 m) of water. Twenty four men were killed in addition to twenty four more men who were survivors from Long and Brooks. Survivors of the Hovey were rescued by the USS West Virginia.


Hovey được đặt lườn vào ngày 18 tháng 8 năm 1918 tại xưởng tàu của hãng William Cramp & Sons ở Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 26 tháng 4 năm 1919, được đỡ đầu bởi Bà Louise F. Kautz, chị Thiếu úy Hovey và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 2 tháng 10 năm 1919 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân Stephen B. McKinney. Nó là một số ít tàu khu trục lớp Clemson được trang bị bốn khẩu pháo 4 inch Mk 14 nòng đôi chúng bị tháo dỡ vào năm 1940.

Giữa hai cuộc thế chiến Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất việc chạy thử máy tại vùng bờ biển Florida, Hovey khởi hành từ Newport, Rhode Island vào ngày 19 tháng 12 năm 1919 cùng với tàu chị em Chandler để đi Azores và Breast, Pháp để phục vụ như một tàu trạm. Nó khởi hành từ Dalmatia, Ý vào ngày 10 tháng 7 năm 1920 để làm nhiệm vụ cùng Lực lượng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ tại vùng biển Adriatic. Đi đến Constantinople vào ngày 12 tháng 7, nó sau đó viếng thăm các cảng Nga trong Hắc Hải như một tàu trạm cho đến ngày 17 tháng 12, khi nó lên đường đi Port Said, Ai Cập. Nó lên đường, đi qua kênh đào Suez và Ấn Độ Dương để nhận nhiệm vụ cùng Hạm đội Á Châu tại Cavite, Philippines. Hovey tiếp tục vụ vụ tại Viễn Đông cho đến khi nó lên đường quay trở về nhà, về đến San Francisco, California vào ngày 2 tháng 10 năm 1922, và được cho xuất biên chế tại San Diego vào ngày 1 tháng 2 năm 1923.

Hovey được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 20 tháng 2 năm 1930 tại San Diego, California dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân Stuart O. Greig. Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy ngoài khơi San Diego và Mare Island, nó phục vụ chủ yếu như tàu huấn luyện cho quân nhân dự bị cho đến ngày 9 tháng 4 năm 1934, khi nó băng qua kênh đào Panama và đi đến New York vào ngày 31 tháng 5. Sau một giai đoạn huấn luyện và thực hành hạm đội ngoài khơi bờ biển New England và Florida, Hovey quay trở về San Diego vào ngày 9 tháng 11. Nó được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island, rồi tiếp tục phục vụ dọc theo vùng bờ Tây trong các hoạt động thực hành và tập trận Vấn đề Hạm đội tại vùng kênh đào và vùng biển Hawaii.

Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

Hovey được cải biến thành một tàu quét mìn cao tốc và được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn mới DMS-11 vào ngày 19 tháng 11 năm 1940. Sau khi được huấn luyện khẩn trương, nó khởi hành vào ngày 4 tháng 2 năm 1941 để nhận nhiệm vụ tại Trân Châu Cảng. Khi Nhật Bản bất ngờ tấn công Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 7 tháng 12 năm 1941, nó đang cùng với tàu khu trục chị em Chandler hộ tống chống tàu ngầm cho tàu tuần dương Minneapolis trong một cuộc thực hành tác xạ cách 20 nmi (37 km) ngoài khơi Trân Châu Cảng. Chiếc tàu quét mìn lập tức đảm nhiệm tuần tra và hộ tống vận tải chung quanh Trân Châu Cảng cho đến ngày 20 tháng 5 năm 1942, khi nó hộ tống một đoàn tàu 20 chiếc đi San Francisco, đến nơi vào ngày 31 tháng 5. Nó quay trở lại Trân Châu Cảng vào giữa tháng 6, rồi lên đường vào ngày 10 tháng 7 cùng với tàu khu trục chị em Southard hộ tống cho chiếc Argonne để hướng đến khu vực Tây Nam Thái Bình Dương. Nó đi đến quần đảo Fiji vào ngày 23 tháng 7, và tham gia đội quét mìn trực thuộc Lực lượng Đổ bộ Nam Thái Bình Dương dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Richmond K. Turner.

Chiến dịch quần đảo Solomon Sửa đổi

Trong trận Guadalcanal, cuộc tấn công đổ bộ đầu tiên của Đồng Minh trong một chuỗi các chiến dịch nhảy cóc lên các đảo, vào ngày 7 tháng 8, Hovey được giao nhiệm vụ bảo vệ các tàu vận tải, và ngay trước 08 giờ 00, nó chiếm lấy vị trí bắn phá để hỗ trợ cho việc đổ bộ lên phía Đông Gavutu. Các khẩu đội pháo duyên hải Nhật Bản nổ súng nhưng nhanh chóng bị hỏa lực chính xác của Hovey và các tàu hỗ trợ hỏa lực khác làm im tiếng. Sau đó nó cùng các tàu quét mìn khác làm nhiệm vụ quét mìn giữa Gavutu và Bungana. Sáng hôm sau, nó đi vào eo biển Lengo để giúp đánh trả cuộc tấn công của một liên đội máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi đối phương. Hỏa lực phòng không dày đặc của phía Đồng Minh đã buộc các máy bay Nhật phải phóng ngư lôi sớm, và vì vậy ở khoảng cách quá xa nên đợt tấn công hầu như không có hiệu quả.

Hovey tiếp tục các hoạt động chung quanh Guadalcanal trước khi rút lui về New Caledonia vào ngày 13 tháng 9 để tiếp liệu. Từ đây nó đi đến Samoa trước khi quay trở lại Ndeni, Santa Cruz cùng một đội trinh sát Thủy quân Lục chiến. Quay trở lại New Caledonia, nó khởi hành vào ngày 10 tháng 10, kéo theo hai tàu tuần tra-phóng lôi PT boat cùng 127 thùng xăng máy bay trên tàu để chuyển giao đến Tulagi hai ngày sau đó. Nó tiếp tục làm nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải giữa Guadalcanal và Espiritu Santo, cho đến khi quay về San Francisco vào ngày 19 tháng 4 năm 1943 để đại tu và sau khi hoàn tất, nó rời Xưởng hải quân Mare Island cùng một đoàn tàu vận tải vào ngày 31 tháng 5 để đi New Caledonia, đến nơi vào ngày 10 tháng 8. Nó tiếp nối nhiệm vụ tuần tra và hộ tống vận tải cho đến ngày 30 tháng 10, khi nó gia nhập Lực lượng Đổ bộ III dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Theodore S. Wilkinson cho cuộc đổ bộ lên mũi Torokina vào ngày 1 tháng 11 năm 1943. Trong một tuần lễ tiếp theo, lúc đang diễn ra cuộc chiếm đóng vịnh Nữ hoàng Augusta, nó hoạt động cùng với lực lượng đổ bộ, bảo vệ các tàu vận tải và quét mìn chuẩn bị.

Hovey tiếp tục nhiệm vụ hộ tống và bảo vệ tại khu vực quần đảo Solomon cho đến ngày 5 tháng 4 năm 1944, khi nó hộ tống cho chiếc di chuyển từ Tulagi đến Majuro, thuộc quần đảo Marshall. Nó quay trở lại Espiritu Santo vào ngày 11 tháng 4, và đến ngày 20 tháng 4 đã gia nhập Đơn vị Đặc nhiệm 34.9.3 dưới quyền Đại tá Hải quân Kane trên chiếc tàu sân bay hộ tống Petrof Bay để chuyển giao máy bay thay thế cho các tàu sân bay khác tại Manus. Đơn vị đặc nhiệm đã gặp gỡ Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm Tàu sân bay nhanh 58 để cung cấp máy bay thay thế cho các cuộc không kích đầu tiên xuống Truk. Tiếp tục đi đến đảo Florida, chiếc tàu khu trục lên đường quay về vùng bờ Tây, đi ngang qua Trân Châu Cảng và đến nơi vào ngày 31 tháng 5.

Các chiến dịch Trung tâm Thái Bình Dương Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất việc sửa chữa, Hovey khởi hành đi Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 29 tháng 7, nơi nó trở thàn soái hạm của Hải đội Quét mìn 2 dưới quyền Trung tá Hải quân W. R. Loud. Nó khởi hành từ cảng Purvis vào ngày 6 tháng 9 trong thành phần hộ tống chống tàu ngầm cho Đội Hỗ trợ Hỏa lực phía Tây dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Jesse B. Oldendorf cho các hoạt động ở phía Nam Palaus. Sau khi quét mìn tại khu vực giữa các đảo Angaur và Peleliu và tại eo biển Kossol, nó làm nhiệm vụ tuần tra chống tàu ngầm tại khu vực vận chuyển ngoài khơi Peleliu. Sau đó nó gia nhập nhóm quét mìn và thủy âm trực thuộc đội tàu sân bay hộ tống dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Thomas Sprague cho chiến dịch chiếm đóng Leyte từ ngày 17 đến ngày 25 tháng 10 năm 1944. Vào ngày 17 tháng 10, nó bắt đầu quét mìn mở đường cho các tàu vận chuyển cao tốc và tàu hỗ trợ hỏa lực tại lối tiếp cận bãi đổ bộ trên đảo Dinagat. Sau các hoạt động quét mìn khác giữa vịnh Looc và lối tiếp cận Tacloban-Dulag, nó rút lui về Manus vào ngày 25 tháng 10.

Chiếm đóng Luzon Sửa đổi

Trong vai trò soái hạm của đội quét mìn và thủy âm dưới quyền Trung tá Loud, Hovey khởi hành từ Manus vào ngày 23 tháng 12, và đi đến vịnh Leyte vào ngày 30 tháng 12. Nó lên đường vào ngày 2 tháng 1 năm 1945, tiến về phía Nam để đi qua eo biển Surigao và tiến vào biển Mindanao để hướng đến vịnh Lingayen, Luzon. Nhiều máy bay trinh sát đối phương đã quấy phá đoàn tàu trong đêm, nhưng không có cuộc tấn công nào cho đến sáng ngày 3 tháng 1.

Từ lúc đó trở đi, đoàn tàu liên tục chịu đựng các cuộc không kích nặng nề, đến mức Hovey phải áp dụng chính sách không nổ súng trừ khi bị tấn công trực tiếp, vì nó lo ngại sẽ tiêu phí hết đạn dược mang theo. Ở lối ra vào vịnh Lingayen lúc 08 giờ 00, các tàu quét mìn bị tấn công, và Hovey bắn rơi ngay một máy bay tấn công cảm tử kamikaze. Khi các con tàu quay mũi cho lượt quét mìn thứ hai, hai chiếc kamikaze khác tấn công vào hai con tàu ở cuối cột đội hình, đâm bổ vào BrooksLong. Hovey giảm tốc độ và tiếp cận để trợ giúp Long, khi toàn bộ cầu tàu và sàn tàu của Long bốc cháy xen kẻ với những vụ nổ nhỏ từ hầm đạn phía trước và đạn dược. Do các vụ nổ và nguy cơ không kích, Hovey không thể cặp sát mạn, nhưng đã trải qua một giờ gần đó để vớt 149 người sống sót. Khi trời tối, các tàu quét mìn rút lui ra khỏi lối ra vào vịnh Lingayen.

Không có đợt tấn công nào khác cho đến 04 giờ 25 phút ngày 7 tháng 1, khi họ bắt được tín hiệu máy bay đối phương trên màn hình radar. Đến 04 giờ 50 phút, một máy bay bay thấp trên mặt nước từ mạn phải và bay ngang bên trên Hovey. Lát sau, một chiếc khác xuất hiện bên mạn trái và bị Chandler bắn chặn tuy nhiên nó vẫn xoay xở bay thấp trên mặt nước và đâm vào mạn phải của Hovey và gây một đám cháy, tiếp nối ngay lập tức bởi một quả ngư lôi trúng vào mạn phải ở phòng động cơ phía sau. Điện và động lực bị mất ngay lập tức con tàu bị vỡ làm đôi, phần đuôi tàu được giữ gần như cân bằng và bị ngập nước cho đến cấu trúc thượng tầng phía sau, trong khi phần mũi bị nghiêng 40° sang mạn phải và bị nhấc lên khỏi mặt nước. Hai phút sau, phần mũi nghiêng đến 90°, nhấc thẳng đứng và chìm nhanh chóng ở độ sâu 54 sải (99 m), ở tọa độ 16°20′B 120°10′Đ  /  16,333°B 120,167°Đ  / 16.333 120.167 Tọa độ: 16°20′B 120°10′Đ  /  16,333°B 120,167°Đ  / 16.333 120.167 . Hai mươi bốn thành viên thủy thủ đoàn đã thiệt mạng trong cuộc tấn công cùng với 24 người tử trận khác là những người sống sót của LongBrooks. Những người sống sót được thiết giáp hạm USS West Virginia cứu vớt.

Hovey được tặng thưởng tám Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Seznam voja&scaronkih vsebin podaja članke, ki se v Wikipediji nana&scaronajo na vojsko, oborožene sile, za&scarončito in obrambo.

Unijapedija je koncept, zemljevid ali semantično mrežo, organizirano kot enciklopedije - slovar. To je na kratko opredelitev vsakega koncepta in njegovih odnosov.

To je velikanski spletni mentalni zemljevid, ki služi kot osnova za koncept diagramov. To je prost za uporabo in vsak članek ali dokument, ki se lahko prenese. To je orodje, vir ali predlog za študije, raziskave, izobraževanje, učenje in poučevanje, ki jih učitelji, vzgojitelji, dijaki ali študenti lahko uporablja Za akademskega sveta: za šolo, primarno, sekundarno, gimnazije, srednje tehnične stopnje, šole, univerze, dodiplomski, magistrski ali doktorski stopinj za papir, poročil, projektov, idej, dokumentacije, raziskav, povzetkov, ali teze. Tu je definicija, razlaga, opis ali pomen vsakega pomembno, na kateri želite informacije in seznam njihovih povezanih konceptov kot pojmovnika. Na voljo v Slovenski, Angleščina, Španski, Portugalski, Japonski, Kitajski, Francosko, Nemški, Italijansko, Poljski, Nizozemski, Rusko, Arabsko, Hindi, Švedski, Ukrajinski, Madžarski, Katalonščina, Češka, Hebrejščina, Danski, Finski, Indonezijski, Norveški, Romunščina, Turški, Vietnamščina, Korejščina, Thai, Grški, Bolgarski, Hrvaški, Slovak, Litvanski, Filipino, Latvijski in Estonski Več jezikov kmalu.

Google Play, Android in logotip Googla Play sta blagovni znamki podjetja Google Inc.


With hundreds of state and local chapters across the country, The Arc’s chapter network is on the frontlines from first breath to last to ensure that people with I/DD have the support and services they need to be fully engaged in their communities.

Our chapters provide a wide variety of services, supports, and advocacy for people with I/DD and their families. This varies by chapter and includes but is not limited to: individual and public policy advocacy residential, educational, and vocational services person-centered and financial planning recreational activities and other supports that meet the unique needs of the community.


8. The English won the battle, but lost the war.

While Agincourt ranks as one of the most one-sided victories in medieval history, it didn’t have any major implications for the outcome of the Hundred Years’ War. The English sailed home after the battle and didn’t return to France until 1417, when Henry V launched a successful campaign that ended with a treaty establishing him as the successor to the French King Charles VI. Henry died before he could claim the throne, however, and the French later rallied behind the likes of King Charles VII and the teenaged military leader Joan of Arc. Over the next several decades, a resilient France retook Paris, Normandy and several other key regions. By the time they were defeated at the Battle of Castillon in 1453—the traditional end date for the Hundred Years’ War—the English had lost nearly all of their French territories.

Objects from the Battle of Agincourt on display at the Tower of London on October 22, 2015, to commemorate the battle’s 600th anniversary.

(Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)


Tests of Adaptive Functioning

As mentioned, intellectual disabilities (ID, formerly mental retardation) have two key diagnostic criteria. These are intellectual functioning (IQ) and adaptive functioning. Tests of adaptive functioning evaluate the social and emotional maturity of a child, relative to his or her peers. They also help to evaluate life skills and abilities. Commonly used tests of adaptive functioning are described below:

Woodcock-Johnson Scales of Independent Behavior: This test measures independent behavior in children.

Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS): This test measures the social skills of people from birth to 19 years of age. This test is not administered directly to the child. Instead, questions are directed to primary caregivers and other people familiar with the child. The test contains four sections. These are communication daily living skills socialization and motor skills. This test is also used for children with behavioral disorders, and physical handicaps.

The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (AAIDD, 2013): This test measures adaptive behavioral skills. There are three main categories of these skills. This includes conceptual, social, and practical life skills. This test is very helpful for determining the intensity and types of supports needed to maximize independent functioning and quality of life. However, a more useful and appropriate test for that purpose is the Supports Intensity Scale (AAIDD, 2004).


1919-1940 Modifier

Après des essais le long de la côte de la Floride et dans les Caraïbes, il appareille de Newport et traverse l'Atlantique en passant par les Açores pour commencer son service en mer Méditerranée et en mer Noire. Le Hovey transite par le canal de Suez en décembre 1920 , rejoint l'Extrême-Orient où il opère avec la flotte asiatique dans les Philippines. En 1922, le destroyer rejoint la Californie et est retiré du service à San Diego au début du mois de février 1923 .

Le Hovey reprend le service en février 1930 , passant le reste de la décennie à l’entraînement dans la reserve fleets ou servant auprès de la flotte américaine, principalement dans le Pacifique. Le destroyer effectue un voyage à New York en 1934 et visite également les eaux hawaïennes, panaméennes et alaskiennes [ 1 ] .

George Thomas Sullivan et Francis Henry Sullivan, deux des cinq frères Sullivan, ont servi à bord du Hovey.

Seconde Guerre mondiale Modifier

Modifié en dragueur de mines rapide à la fin de 1940 où il est renommé DMS-11, il est transféré à Pearl Harbor en février 1941 . Après l'attaque surprise japonaise du 7 décembre 1941 contre la base de la flotte du Pacifique, le Hovey effectue des missions de patrouille et d'escorte dans la région d'Hawaï jusqu'en mai 1942 , date à laquelle il rejoint la côte ouest pour une révision [ 1 ] . En juillet, il est envoyé dans le sud-ouest du Pacifique où il participe à l'invasion de Guadalcanal et de Tulagi en août. Il sert de navire d'escorte et de transport pour la campagne de Guadalcanal pendant le reste de 1942 et les premiers mois de 1943 [ 1 ] . Durant la bataille du cap Espérance en octobre 1942 , il participe aux opérations de sauvetage des survivants du destroyer japonais Fubuki.

Après une révision en Californie, le Hovey retourne dans le sud-ouest du Pacifique en août 1943 . En outre, il participe aux débarquements de Bougainville en novembre 1943 . En septembre 1944 , après des réparations sur la côte ouest, le Hovey appuie l'invasion de Peleliu. Un mois plus tard, il démine le rivage avant le débarquement à Leyte puis drague des mines lors de l'invasion du golfe de Lingayen en janvier 1945 [ 1 ] . Après avoir subi d'intenses attaques suicide par des avions japonais le 6 janvier , il quitte la zone de débarquement tôt le matin du 7 janvier lorsqu'il est victime d'une énième attaque aérienne [ 1 ] . Frappé à son milieu par un kamikaze et une torpille, l'USS Hovey se coupe en deux et sombre en quelques minutes. 48 hommes décèdent dans cette attaque, 24 étaient des membres de l'équipage et les 24 autres étaient des marins des destroyers USS Long et USS Brooks. 229 survivants ont été sauvés par l'USS Chandler et un nombre inconnu par l'USS West Virginia.

Le navire repose à 99 mètres de fond à la position géographique 16° 20′ N, 120° 10′ E.

Le Hovey a reçu huit battles star pour son service dans la Seconde Guerre mondiale.


Watch the video: The Avant Gardes Decline and Fall in the 20th Century In Our Time (January 2022).