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William G. Anderson - History

William G. Anderson - History


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William G. Anderson

William G. Anderson

(Bark: t. 593; 1. 149'7"; b. 30'1"; dph. 14'3"; a. 6
32-padrs., 1 24-pdr. how.)

William G. Anderson—a fast sailing bark built in 1859 at Boston, Mass., by C. F. and H. D. Gardiner— was initially owned by Edmund Boynton of Boston and acquired at Boston by the Navy on 23 August 1861. William G. Anderson was commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard on 2 October 1861, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant William C. Rogers in command.

Standing out to sea on 11 October, William G. Anderson joined the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, searching for Confederate privateers in the sea lanes of the West Indies. At daybreak on 12 November, lookouts on the bark made out a sail running before the wind in the Bahama channel and tacked to give chase. When within four miles, those in William G. Anderson saw the schooner bear away with the British flag at the main masthead. At 0930 the Union vessel succeeded in bringing the stranger to, and discovered her to be the Confederate privateer Beauregard, seven days out of Charleston, S.C. Anderson sent over an officer to board the prize, who found that the crew had gotten drunk and was engaged in spiking the privateer's sole 12-pound pivot gun and cutting her rigging and sails. A prize crew took over the erstwhile privateer, and the Confederate crew was placed in irons on board William G. Anderson.

After bringing her prize into Key West, Fla., on 19 November, William G. Anderson set sail a week later. She cruised off Puerto Rico, Cuba, Bermuda, and the Windward Islands into the spring of the following year. She sighted 210 vessels, boarded 66, and had found Confederate privateers, in her commander's words, "rare during that time." She concluded that cruise at the Boston Navy Yard on 16 April 1862.

William G. Anderson departed Boston on 8 May and joined Rear Admiral David G. Farragut,'s West Gulf Blockading Squadron at Ship Island, off the mouth of the Mississippi River. On 14 June, Acting Master William Bailey and 30 men left the ship under cover of darkness, crossed Mississippi Sound, and sailed about 15 miles up the Jordan River. Penetrating Confederate territory by night, the Union raiders escaped notice by encamped Confederate cavalry and seized the 60-ton Confederate schooner Montebello, a ship used by local forces to transport troops across Mississippi Sound. The raiders managed to tow Montebello out into the sound before they were noticed by the Confederate forces in the vicinity.

Departing the Ship Island station on 25 June, the bark patrolled the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River before she took up a blockade station off Galveston, Tex., on 6 July. At the end of August, while on station off Galveston, William G. Anderson bagged her second prize—the English-owned schooner Lilly. The cargo manifest for Lilly showed that she was apparently carrying only salt, drugs, and quinine. Closer investigation, however, revealed 350 kegs of gunpowder and a consignment letter authorizing the British skipper to turn the material over to the first Confederate Army commander he encountered.

William G. Anderson placed a prize crew of six men under Acting Master C. W. Harriman, on board Lilly and sent her to Key West while the bark resumed her patrols. On 4 September, she intercepted and captured the schooner Theresa, laden with cavalry carbines. Two weeks later, the Union bark bagged another blockade runner, the schooner Reindeer (ex-Jeff Davis) laden with 288 bales of cotton en route to Havana.

William G. Anderson arrived at Pensacola Bay, Fla.,on 3 October and remained there on station, protecting the navy yard until the next spring. Underway on 10 April 1863, the bark resumed blockade duties off the coast of Texas soon thereafter. On 15 April, she captured the cotton-laden schooner Royal Yacht after a six-hour chase. Seven days later, William G. Anderson teamed with Rachel Seaman to capture the schooner Nymph which was attempting to run the Union blockade off Pass Cavallo, Tex.

Just eight days later, William G. Anderson spotted a sloop trying to run the blockade and gave chase. About six miles north of the lighthouse at St. Joseph's Island, Tex., the sloop ran aground and was deserted by her crew. The rough seas that day made it impossible for the Union ship to send men to board the prize, but, on 3 May, the weather had abated enough to permit an expedition shoreward.

William G. Anderson sent in her launch, second cutter, and gig to take off the cotton from the prize. Two of the boats were just in the edge of the breakers as the gig's bow grounded on the beach. At that juncture, Confederate soldiers, under the command of Capt. Edward E. Hawy, CSA, charged down the hill nearby firing as they advanced. The launch and the second cutter managed to clear the beach although hit several times by rifle fire; but the enemy captured the ship's gig and the five men that had been in it. Anderson fired five shots from her pivot gun in an attempt to drive off the enemy, but the ship was beyond effective range.

Stationed off Pilot Town, La., between 27 May and 24 June, William G. Anderson subsequently resumed her blockading operations off the Texas coast. On 25 August, she captured the schooner Mack Canfield laden with 133 bales of cotton—off the mouth of the Rio Grande River. Two days later, the armed Union bark bagged the cotton-laden schooner America, and, although the prize capsized while under tow, William G. Anderson's crew retrieved 40 bales of cotton from the sea.

After cruising off Galveston, William G. Anderson departed that vicinity on 17 September and took station off New Orleans. She remained there until 30 November, when she sailed back to Galveston and another stint of blockading off the Texas coast. Anderson shifted to Pensacola Bay, Fla., on 19 February 1864 and served there protecting the navy yard until 1 April 1865. Entering Mobile Bay on 3 April 1865, William G. Anderson was there six days later when Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House, VA., assuring the speedy end of the Civil War.

William G. Anderson remained in Mobile Bay into the late summer and was then once more stationed at Pensacola Bay, this time from 13 September to 25 November. Alternating between that port and New Orleans until mid-June 1866, the bark set course north from Pensacola on 15 June 1866, bound for the New York Navy Yard.

Arriving there on 30 June, William G. Anderson was decommissioned on 21 July 1866. The erstwhile blockade ship was sold at public auction on 28 August 1866 to A. A. Low and Brother; her subsequent fate is unrecorded.


William G. Anderson - History

As we mark the end of Black History Month 2019, we are reminded of the many men and women of color who, with a passion for people and community, contribute their talents to the practice and evolution of osteopathic medicine. Among the many influential voices and thought leaders in our field, the name William G. Anderson, DO, is certainly a stand out. We would like to take this opportunity to recognize his advocacy of the profession and his role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Anderson, a professor of surgery and senior advisor to the dean at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MSU-COM), holds the distinction of being the first African American on the American Osteopathic Association Board of Trustees and served as the president of the American Osteopathic Association in 1994 and 1995. He also served as associate dean of the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine and as clinical professor of osteopathic surgery at MSU-COM. Dr. Anderson was an active member of the NBOME Board of Directors from 2003 through 2014 and was member of its Executive Committee from 2007 to 2010.

Born in Americus, Georgia, in 1927, Dr. Anderson attended Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine. In Albany, Georgia, he was prevented from treating patients because of segregationist policies in 1957. In response, he founded and became the first president of the Albany Movement, which worked to register African American voters and devised ways to end racial segregation. With this achievement, Dr. Anderson became a pioneer in the Civil Rights Movement and was a personal friend and colleague of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A member of the Physicians for Social Responsibility, he is a frequent speaker on osteopathic medicine and civil rights topics. In 2014, the MSU-COM’s award-winning civil rights lecture series was renamed as the “Dr. William G. Anderson Lecture Series: Slavery to Freedom,” which continues through this year – sadly, the final year of the series.

For more on this year’s lecture series, click here.

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Civil Rights movement leader, Dr. William G. Anderson, to headline

FORT PIERCE -- Dr. William G. Anderson, D.O.&mdashone of the nation&rsquos last living links to Original Six of the American Civil Rights Movement&mdashwill headline the Indian River State College (IRSC) Black History Month event on the evening of Thursday, Feb. 18. The &ldquofireplace chat&rdquo will be hosted on Zoom beginning at 5:30 p.m. Adriene Jefferson, IRSC Equity Officer/Title IX Coordinator and Associate Dean of the Northwest Center will interview Dr. Anderson and moderate questions from event attendees. The event is open to the public.

Founder of the Albany Movement in Georgia in the 1960s, and elected the first African American president of the American Osteopathic Association in 1994, Dr. Anderson began his professional career in the practice of medicine and surgery in Albany, Georgia, as a family physician. During this time, he founded and led the Albany Civil Rights Movement, which spearheaded the Civil Rights Movement in Southwest Georgia. In this role, Dr. Anderson worked closely with other leaders including Dr. Martin Luther King, Rev. Ralph David Abernathy and Mrs. Rosa Parks, to advance the health and general well-being of all the residents of his Albany community.

&ldquoDr. William G. Anderson is a seminal figure in the struggle for American Civil Rights and we are honored to have him address our students and our community,&rdquo states IRSC President, Dr. Timothy Moore. &ldquoDr. Anderson once told me that it takes the deeds of only one person to change another&rsquos life for the better. His deeds have shaped the lives of generations of Americans.&rdquo

Today Dr. Anderson is a frequent lecturer on at many colleges and universities on matters related to the practice of osteopathic medicine and civil rights. The annual Slavery to Freedom Lecture Series at Michigan State University (MSU), now in its 21st year, is named for him.

Dr. Anderson is a physician a faculty member and senior advisor to the Dean of the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine and a founding member of the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine&rsquos Board of Directors. He is a veteran of the United States Navy. Leadership positions held by Dr. Anderson include President of the American Osteopathic Foundation, President of the Michigan Osteopathic Association, President of the Wayne County Osteopathic Medical Association and member of the American Osteopathic Association President&rsquos Advisory Council.

Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Degree from the Des Moines University/College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is certified in General Surgery and is a Fellow in the American College of Osteopathic Surgeons. He has received 12 honorary degrees.

Dr. Anderson was married to the late Norma Dixon of Atlanta, also a civil rights leader. Together they published Autobiographies of a Black Couple of the Greatest Generation, published in 2004, and whose proceeds go to fund the American Osteopathic Foundation&rsquos Minority Scholarships.

Dr. Anderson is the proud father of five children, three of whom have followed him into careers in Osteopathic Medicine. He has two daughters, one who is a Librarian and another who is Project Training Leader of Professional Development for the State of Georgia, and a professor at Kennesaw State University. Four of Dr. Anderson&rsquos grandchildren are in the medical field as well. He is the proud great-grandfather of three.


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      Help improve this article

      Biography of William G. Anderson

      William G. Anderson. A native of Kansas, a member of a prominent old family of Dickinson County, William Gibson Anderson had had a varied experience but early found his real work and vocation in the newspaper profession, and had been actively identified with a number of papers in Southern Kansas. He is now editor and proprietor of the Evening Free Press at Winfield.

      He was born on a farm near Abilene, Kansas, July 30, 1874, attended the public schools of Abilene, graduating from high school in 1894, and his college alma mater is Baker University at Baldwin. He was graduated from Baker in 1898, with the degree Ph. B. While in university he became a member of the Alpha Omega, which subsequently was amalgamated with the Delta Tau Delta, the best known and oldest among the college fraternities.

      On leaving college Mr. Anderson taught science in the Dickinson County High School at Chapman, Kansas, two years. In 1900 he went to Las Vegas, New Mexico, and became a reporter on the Las Vegas Daily Optic, owned by his cousins, the Allen Brothers. In August, 1902, Mr. Anderson bought a half interest in the Traveler at Arkansas City, and was connected with the news and business department of that paper for five years. Selling out in 1907 he went with the Iola Daily Record at Iola, which subsequently was sold to the Iola Register. In the fall of 1910 Mr. Anderson became connected with the Wichita Star, but in the spring of 1911 returned to Arkansas City and was one of the staff of the News until the next fall. In the fall of 1911 Mr. Anderson bought the Evening Free Press at Winfield and had since continued as its active proprietor and editorial manager.

      The Evening Free Press was first published for a number of years as a weekly at Dexter, Kansas. In 1889 it was removed to Winfield and since then had been published as a daily. The Free Press while exercising a large influence in politics is independent and progressive in its attitude. It had a large circulation of readers in Cowley, Chautauqua, Butler, Sumner and other counties. The paper is one of the live ones in Southern Kansas, and Mr. Anderson owned a complete printing plant, located at 111 East Tenth Avenue in Winfield.

      His interest extends to all the movements for the betterment of his home city and state. He is a member of the Winfield Commercial Club, is a steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is affiliated with Crescent Lodge No. 133, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Arkansas City.

      He was married at Barnes, Kansas, December 21, 1900, to Miss Katherine Underwood, daughter of Rev. W. H. and Juliet (Plank) Underwood. Her father, now deceased, was a well known Methodist minister in Kansas, did some of the pioneer work of his church in this state, and was at one time presiding elder. Mrs. Anderson’s mother now lives at Clay Center, Kansas. Mrs. Anderson was born in Irving, this state.

      William G. Anderson is a son of Judge William Stadden Anderson, long prominent in the affairs of Dickinson County and now a resident of Abilene. Judge Anderson was born February 17, 1842, in La Salle County, Illinois, only son of William F. and Anna (Stadden) Anderson. William F. Anderson was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1807, of native Virginia parentage. Anna Stadden was born in Licking County, Ohio, March 19, 1808, her father being a native of Pennsylvania and her mother of Maryland. William F. Anderson located on a farm in La Salle County, Illinois, in 1835 and lived there until his death on February 1, 1846. His wife died in the same county October 10, 1898. Of their six children all were daughters except Judge Anderson. The daughters were: Samantha, born in 1830, now the widow of J. P. Browning and a resident of Henry County, Illinois Catherine Elizabeth, born in 1833, had been three times married and is now a widow Amanda, born in 1835, died in 1894, the wife of T. J. McHenry Mary Jane, born in 1839, is the widow of John F. Gibson, who died in 1905 and Lucy Ann, born March 24, 1845, is the wife of J. D. Lawrence.

      William S. Anderson had a country school education and also attended the Rock River Seminary at Mount Morris, Illinois. In 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company G of the One Hundred and Thirteenth Illinois Infantry and was soon promoted to corporal. On November 6, 1862, the regiment was ordered to Memphis, Tennessee, to join General Sherman. It took part in the movement known as the Tallahatchie expedition, was in the battles of Chickasaw Bluffs and was then sent to Arkansas Post. The regiment arrived in the rear of Vicksburg in May, 1863, and participated in the assault of the 19th and 22d of that month. During this attempt to take Vicksburg from the rear Mr. Anderson was seriously wounded in the right shoulder, was totally disabled by his wound, and was given his honorable discharge at St. Louis December 1, 1863.

      For a time he lived in Illinois, but in 1865 went to Chillicothe, Missouri, and for six years was in the real estate business there. In 1871 he came as a pioneer to Dickinson County, Kansas, and homesteaded a quarter section twelve miles south of Abilene. The final proof on this homestead was made in 1876. In the meantime he had taught school two years, and in 1873 was elected county surveyor and re-elected four times, serving altogether for ten years. He kept his home on the farm, but was always troubled by his old wound and finally removed to Abilene. In 1888 he was elected clerk of the district court, but was defeated in 1890 by the populist upheaval of that year. For twelve years Judge Anderson was in the ice and coal business at Abilene. In 1908 he was nominated and elected probate judge of Dickinson County and was re-elected in 1910. Since leaving that office he had looked after his private affairs and had led rather a retired life.

      Judge Anderson had always been a loyal and stalwart republican. He is one of the charter members of Abilene Post No. 63, Grand Army of the Republic, was its commander in 1867, had filled all the other offices, and was a member of the State Council of Administration of the Grand Army in 1908. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and for six years was treasurer of the Abilene school board.

      Judge Anderson was married at Chillicothe, Missouri, December 13, 1866, to Miss Jennie B. Gibson, daughter of John Gibson, a native Virginian and a farmer who died at Carrollton, Missouri, in 1880. Judge and Mrs. Anderson had seven children. Jessie D., born at Chillicothe, Missouri, October 25, 1867, was married in 1891 to R. A. Baker, a Dickinson County farmer, and at her death in January, 1901, she was survived by two children. Elizabeth, born October 25, 1869, is the widow of A. S. Hill, a lumberman of Tacoma, Washington, who died in 1903. Kate Gertrude, born September 15, 1872, married J. E. Nickels, a merchant at Talmage, Kansas. The next in age is William Gibson Anderson, editor of the Evening Free Press at Winfield. Edna, born November 5, 1876, is the wife of Horace Johnson, a sugar chemist at Honolulu in the Hawahan Islands. Fred Q., born December 24, 1880, died at Tacoma, Washington, June 1, 1908, and Anna, born June 8, 1886, died March 21, 1888.


      William G. Anderson: President of the Albany Movement

      William G. Anderson first gained national attention as the president of the Albany Movement. Later, he was recognized as a renowned osteopathic physician, educator, surgeon, and hospital administrator.

      After the Navy, Anderson returned to Georgia. He removed with his wife Norma Lee Dixon, a former classmate at Fort Valley State, to Atlanta. Anderson enrolled at the Atlanta College of Mortuary Science, where he completed his degree in 1947. He then moved his family to Montgomery, Alabama where he found work at a black funeral home while attending night classes at Alabama State College. While in Montgomery, he formed a friendship with Ralph Abernathy, who later became Anderson’s colleague in the civil rights movement. He later formed a friendship with Martin Luther King Jr., who was then a student at Morehouse College.

      William G. Anderson - History

      WILLIAM G. ANDERSON. A native of Kansas, a member of a prominent old family of Dickinson County, William Gibson Anderson has had a varied experience but early found his real work and vocation in the newspaper profession, and has been actively identified with a number of papers in Southern Kansas. He is now editor and proprietor of the Evening Free Press at Winfield.

      He was born on a farm near Abilene, Kansas, July 30, 1874, attended the public schools of Abilene, graduating from high school in 1894, and his college alma mater is Baker University at Baldwin. He was graduated from Baker in 1898, with the degree Ph. B. While in university he became a member of the Alpha Omega, which subsequently was amalgamated with the Delta Tau Delta, the best known and oldest among the college fraternities.

      On leaving college Mr. Anderson taught science in the Dickinson County High School at Chapman, Kansas, two years. In 1900 he went to Las Vegas, New Mexico, and became a reporter on the Las Vegas Daily Optic, owned by his cousins, the Allen Brothers. In August, 1902, Mr. Anderson bought a half interest in the Traveler at Arkansas City, and was connected with the news and business department of that paper for five years. Selling out in 1907 he went with the Iola Daily Record at Iola, which subsequently was sold to the Iola Register. In the fall of 1910 Mr. Anderson became connected with the Wichita Star, but in the spring of 1911 returned to Arkansas City and was one of the staff of the News until the next fall. In the fall of 1911 Mr. Anderson bought the Evening Free Press at Winfield and has since continued as its active proprietor and editorial manager.

      The Evening Free Press was first published for a number of years as a weekly at Dexter, Kansas. In 1889 it was removed to Winfield and since then has been published as a daily. The Free Press while exercising a large influence in politics is independent and progressive in its attitude. It has a large circulation of readers in Cowley, Chautauqua, Butler, Sumner and other counties. The paper is one of the live ones in Southern Kansas, and Mr. Anderson owns a complete printing plant, located at 111 East Tenth Avenue in Winfield.

      His interest extends to all the movements for the betterment of his home city and state. He is a member of the Winfield Commercial Club, is a steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is affiliated with Crescent Lodge No. 133, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Arkansas City.

      He was married at Barnes, Kansas, December 21, 1900, to Miss Katherine Underwood, daughter of Rev. W. H. and Juliet (Plank) Underwood. Her father, now deceased, was a well known Methodist minister in Kansas, did some of the pioneer work of his church in this state, and was at one time presiding elder. Mrs. Anderson's mother now lives at Clay Center, Kansas. Mrs. Anderson was born in Irving, this state.

      William G. Anderson is a son of Judge William Stadden Anderson, long prominent in the affairs of Dickinson County and now a resident of Abilene. Judge Anderson was born February 17, 1842, in La Salle County, Illinois, only son of William F. and Anna (Stadden) Anderson. William F. Anderson was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1807, of native Virginia parentage. Anna Stadden was born in Licking County, Ohio, March 19, 1808, her father being a native of Pennsylvania and her mother of Maryland. William F. Anderson located on a farm in La Salle County, Illinois, in 1835 and lived there until his death on February 1, 1846. His wife died in the same county October 10, 1898. Of their six children all were daughters except Judge Anderson. The daughters were: Samantha, born in 1830, now the widow of J. P. Browning and a resident of Henry County, Illinois Catherine Elizabeth, born in 1833, has been three times married and is now a widow Amanda, born in 1835, died in 1894, the wife of T. J. McHenry Mary Jane, born in 1839, is the widow of John F. Gibson, who died in 1905 and Lucy Ann, born March 24, 1845, is the wife of J. D. Lawrence.

      William S. Anderson had a country school education and also attended the Rock River Seminary at Mount Morris, Illinois. In 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company G of the One Hundred and Thirteenth Illinois Infantry and was soon promoted to corporal. On November 6, 1862, the regiment was ordered to Memphis, Tennessee, to join General Sherman. It took part in the movement known as the Tallahatchie expedition, was in the battles of Chickasaw Bluffs and was then sent to Arkansas Post. The regiment arrived in the rear of Vicksburg in May, 1863, and participated in the assault of the 19th and 22d of that month. During this attempt to take Vicksburg from the rear Mr. Anderson was seriously wounded in the right shoulder, was totally disabled by his wound, and was given his honorable discharge at St. Louis December 1, 1863.

      For a time he lived in Illinois, but in 1865 went to Chillicothe, Missouri, and for six years was in the real estate business there. In 1871 he came as a pioneer to Dickinson County, Kansas, and homesteaded a quarter section twelve miles south of Abilene. The final proof on this homestead was made in 1876. In the meantime he had taught school two years, and in 1873 was elected county surveyor and re-elected four times, serving altogether for ten years. He kept his home on the farm, but was always troubled by his old wound and finally removed to Abilene. In 1888 he was elected clerk of the district court, but was defeated in 1890 by the populist upheaval of that year. For twelve years Judge Anderson was in the ice and coal business at Abilene. In 1908 he was nominated and elected probate judge of Dickinson County and was re-elected in 1910. Since leaving that office he has looked after his private affairs and has led rather a retired life.

      Judge Anderson has always been a loyal and stalwart republican. He is one of the charter members of Abilene Post No. 63, Grand Army of the Republic, was its commander in 1867, has filled all the other offices, and was a member of the State Council of Administration of the Grand Army in 1908. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and for six years was treasurer of the Abilene school board.

      Judge Anderson was married at Chillicothe, Missouri, December 13, 1866, to Miss Jennie B. Gibson, daughter of John Gibson, a native Virginian and a farmer who died at Carrollton, Missouri, in 1880. Judge and Mrs. Anderson had seven children. Jessie D., born at Chillicothe, Missouri, October 25, 1867, was married in 1891 to R. A. Baker, a Dickinson County farmer, and at her death in January, 1901, she was survived by two children. Elizabeth, born October 25, 1869, is the widow of A. S. Hill, a lumberman of Tacoma, Washington, who died in 1903. Kate Gertrude, born September 15, 1872, married J. E. Nickels, a merchant at Talmage, Kansas. The next in age is William Gibson Anderson, editor of the Evening Free Press at Winfield. Edna, born November 5, 1876, is the wife of Horace Johnson, a sugar chemist at Honolulu in the Hawaiian Islands. Fred Q., born December 24, 1880, died at Tacoma, Washington, June 1, 1908, and Anna, born June 8, 1886, died March 21, 1888.

      A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans, written & compiled by William E. Connelley, 1918, transcribed by Jeremiah Heck, student from USD 508, Baxter Springs Middle School, Baxter Springs, Kansas, March 15, 1999.


      Opened Group Practice in Detroit

      Albany did remove all segregation statutes on the books in 1963, but not before Anderson was arrested and convicted on federal charges of juror intimidation and perjury, because of protests against a local white business owner who had acquitted a county sheriff of murder of a demonstrator. However, due to the many threats to his family and himself, Anderson moved to Detroit. He took a residency position at the Art Center Clinical Group. He then opened a group practice where he treated patients until 1984. He continued to make strides in his profession, even becoming the first African American president of the American Osteopathic Association.

      Anderson later would focus his attention on helping others become doctors of osteopathy by developing educational programs for the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine and Detroit Riverview Hospital. He joined numerous organizations, and sat on several boards. He has been honored by every major organization in his profession and has received several honorary doctorates. Posted on the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) website, Barbara Ross-Lee, DO, who introduced Anderson at the AACOM luncheon where he was presented with the Dale Dodson Award, stated that Anderson "has focused not only on improving the health of his individual patients, but on improving the health of the society in which his patients live." In addition to his commitment to his profession and the rights of his people, Anderson also co-authored a book with his wife, Autobiographies of a Black Couple of the Greatest Generation. His commitment to his profession and to the lives of minorities has been honored with the 2001 creation of the William G. Anderson Minority Scholarship at the American Osteopathic Foundation.


      William G. Anderson: First Black Surgical Resident in Detroit & President of the Albany Movement

      William G. Anderson first gained national attention as the president of the Albany Movement. Later, he was recognized as a renowned osteopathic physician, educator, surgeon, and hospital administrator.

      Anderson was born in Americus, Georgia on December 12, 1927, to Emma Jean Gilchrist and John Daniel Anderson Sr. He graduated high school at the age of fifteen and went on to enroll at Fort Valley State College, where he pursued a premedical path. At the age of seventeen, his education came to a halt, when he enlisted in the U.S. Navy in the midst of World War II.

      He was initially attached to the first integrated company in the Navy. However, he suffered from acute tonsillitis, which prevented him from joining his company in the Pacific. After his recovery, he was reassigned to a company stationed in the Philippines, and was selected to join the Navy’s Hospital Corpsmen.

      After the Navy, Anderson returned to Georgia. He removed with his wife Norma Lee Dixon, a former classmate at Fort Valley State, to Atlanta. Anderson enrolled at the Atlanta College of Mortuary Science, where he completed his degree in 1947. He then moved his family to Montgomery, Alabama where he found work at a black funeral home while attending night classes at Alabama State College. While in Montgomery, he formed a friendship with Ralph Abernathy, who later became Anderson’s colleague in the civil rights movement. He later formed a friendship with Martin Luther King Jr., who was then a student at Morehouse College.

      Anderson, initially expressed reservations over pursuing a medical career in osteopathy, a visit to the bustling Albany office of physician Willie Joe Reese convinced Anderson of the field’s worth. Reese, then the only practicing African American osteopath in the South, persuaded Anderson to apply to the Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy in Iowa and promised to recommend him to the school’s dean.

      After completing his degree at the Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy in Iowa, Anderson returned to open up his own practice in Albany, Georgia. Anderson joined a small but close-knit community of black professionals, most of whom belonged to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Urban League, or the Criterion Club, a local civic organization.

      In 1961, the city’s black leaders formed the Albany Movement in mid-November, and they selected Anderson as their president because he was relatively new to town and largely insulated from white economic reprisals by his private practice. Anderson invited his old friends Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Abernathy to lead demonstrations in Albany.

      Many observers viewed the Albany Movement as unsuccessful because it failed to secure the immediate desegregation of municipal spaces and institutions. The Albany Movement dissolved in 1962 Anderson then accepted an appointment as house physician at Art Centre Hospital in Detroit, Michigan. He also went on to become the first black surgical resident in Detroit’s history.


      Black History Month: Medical & Civil Rights Pioneer Dr. William G. Anderson

      He has been a ground-breaking osteopathic physician and a champion for equal rights. He was the first Black osteopathic physician to become a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and the first Black physician to become president of the AOA.

      Albany Movement led by Dr. William G. Anderson

      Born in 1927 in Americus, Georgia, Anderson came from a family considered to be middle class in his community. His father was an insurance salesman, and his mother was an elementary school teacher. At a fairly young age, Anderson expressed a desire to become a physician. However, his goal was not encouraged because this career was considered at the time unobtainable for a Black man. He initially attended Fort Valley State College. By this time, he had already worked as a bellhop, a bartender, a farmhand, and a laborer.

      He joined the Navy as World War II was ending. After returning from the Navy, he met and married Norma Dixon and moved to Atlanta where he attended Atlanta College of Mortuary Science. After graduation, he moved to Montgomery Alabama, and began working as a mortician. He continued this career after moving to Atlanta. It was here that, after a chance meeting with a Black osteopathic physician, he finally launched his medical career.

      Eventually, he was able to attend Des Moines University and graduate with a certification in surgery. After graduation and a Michigan internship, he moved to Albany, Georgia to establish his practice. While in Albany, he became active in civil rights and founded the Albany Movement, a civil rights organization focused on ending segregation within the community. The organization drew the attention of Dr. Martin Luther King and other leaders who came to Albany to offer their support and assistance. Dr. Anderson literally participated in scores of marches for civil rights.

      He and his wife, Norma L. Anderson, eventually authored a book about their lives and experiences entitled Autobiographies of a Black Couple of the Greatest Generation.


      Watch the video: THE EXECUTION OF - Private Eddie Slovik - UNLUCKIEST. SOLDIER OF WW2 (July 2022).


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